We Asked, You Said, We Did

Below are some of the issues we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We Asked

In February 2019 West Sussex County Council SEND Commissioning Team asked you what Short Breaks opportunities you would like to have for young adults in West Sussex. We asked you about this, to help us develop our Short Breaks offer for 18 to 25 year olds.

The team would like to thank the staff, volunteers and young adults at PACSO Job Club, Ashdown Extra (Guildcare), Crawley College, M8s youth group Bognor, Young Voices 4 You and everyone who completed the online survey for your views and comments.

You Said

The top three activities you said you liked were

  • Going out; from meals out, to local attractions, and further away like trips to theme parks. This included the chance to go out in the evenings.
  • Socialising and making friends
  • Cooking

The top three skills you said you wanted to build were

  • Making friends, and talking to/meeting new people
  • Doing more for yourself/life skills
  • Team work/being part of a team with other people your own age

You told us that you would like to follow your own interests like art, cooking, go-karting and outdoor adventure activities.

Some of your ideas would make really good Compass Card offers. We are working with Amaze, who run the Compass Card scheme to develop their offers for young adults. You can find out more about the Compass Card scheme here  https://www.compasscard.org.uk/

You said that everyone is different. Travel training might be great for one person but may not work so well for someone else. You said we need to think about different ways that different people can learn to do more for themselves , for example helping out with preparing a meal.

You said that you would like us to develop more opportunities for young adults in this age group to take part in Short Breaks, as you do not feel there is enough available for over 18s.

We Did

Michael, Short Breaks Commissioning Manager, has written a short list of ideas for Short Breaks, using the comments and views you gave us.

  • Pub or Dinner Club (this could happen once a week)

Activities could include: eating, drinking, buying your own food and drinks, chatting with friends, play pub games (maybe snooker/pool and darts).

  • Residential (this could happen maybe once or twice in the year)

A residential break would happen somewhere in West Sussex and would include one or two nights away. You would be with people of a similar age to you and you would have a timetable of events for your break.

Activities could include: eating, drinking, chatting with friends, cooking meals, washing up, shopping on a budget, making your bed, travelling on public transport, going out to do something in the community i.e. cinema, bowling.

  • Lifeskills (this could happen once a week)

A course run in West Sussex where you would get to learn some new skills that will help you in your adult life.

Activities could include: cooking, being able to travel on your own on public transport, looking after your money, making friends, staying healthy, coping with stress, having a boyfriend or girlfriend, sex education.

We will work on these ideas with the Young Voices 4 You group, who are our young people’s reference group in West Sussex, to develop one or two of them into new Short Breaks opportunities for young adults.

Information on the progress of these new Short Breaks will be published on the Participation and Short Breaks Wiki webpages , so please check these for any further updates. https://wiki.rixwiki.org/west-sussex-mmm/home/commissioning-team/

https://wiki.rixwiki.org/west-sussex-mmm/home/youth-participation-1

If you, or someone you know aged 14 to 25, would like to join Young Voices 4 You as a youth ambassador, taking part in projects including developing Short Breaks, please contact rachel.sadler@westsussex.gov.uk 07734000401

We Asked

We asked you to tell us how well informed you felt about the way the Council manages its budget and the type budget-related challenges the council is facing, and whether or not you felt you received enough information about these.

We also asked for your ideas on how we might generate income to help protect as many of our services as possible. 

 

You Said

We received 720 responses to our survey.  The key findings are listed below: 

96% of respondents either agreed (61%) or strongly agreed (35%) with the statement ‘I am interested in the budget decisions made by the Council’.

27% of respondents had previously taken part in our ‘What Matters To You?’ survey - the survey which helps to inform decisions around budget setting and Council Tax levels.

When asked to indicate ‘How informed are you about the challenges the Council faces in balancing the budget?’ on a scale of 1-10 (where 1= not at all informed and 10= very well informed), 46% of respondents indicated a score of 5 or less, whereas 55% indicated a score between 6-10, although the highest number of respondents indicating a 7 (16%). 

Using the same scale (where 1= not at all informed and 10= very well informed), when asked ‘How well informed do you feel about the Council's budget proposals for 2019/2020?’ 72% gave a lower end score of 5 or less, with the highest number of respondents (17%) indicating a score of 3.  16% indicated a score of 1.

70% of respondents either agreed (52%) or strongly agreed (18%) with the statement, ‘I understand the scale of savings that the Council still has to make to their budget over the next few years’.

92% either agreed (47%) or strongly agreed (45%) with the statement   ‘I am aware the Council has received a significant drop in its funding’.

66% indicated they either agreed (49%) or strongly agreed (17%) with the statement ‘I read the information I received about budget spending in my Council Tax letter for 2018/19

55% indicated they received ‘not nearly enough’ information about the Budget, whereas 44% indicated ‘About the right amount of information, and just under 1% indicated ‘Too much information’.

We Did

As a result of this survey, we have strengthened our efforts to keep our businesses and residents informed of budget-related information, particularly in relation to the 2019/20 budget.  We have increased our digital and traditional marketing efforts and the way we present our information, including a refresh of the council tax leaflet.

We are currently processing and considering all the ideas and suggestions made in relation to how we might save money or generate income to help protect as many of our services as possible. 

 

We Asked

We conducted an online resident survey from 3rd December 2018 to 11th January 2019, asking 11 questions to give a flavour of what our residents currently think about EVs and what they would like the charging infrastructure to look like across the county in the future.

You Said

Thank you to all of the people that completed the survey. We received 1339 responses in total.

Some of the highlights are:

  • 60% of you would like to own an electric car
  • 84% of you want to charge at home
  • 60% of you want to charge at destinations
  • Lack of public charging is preventing / discouraging 57% of you switching
  • Cost of EV cars is  preventing / discouraging 55% of you switching
  • 36% of you would be willing to pay more to charge on a public network than at home.

We Did

All the results received are being collated and reviewed, and we will use them to inform the next stage of the strategy development.

We are aiming to have a final strategy drafted for approval by November 2019. An additional public consultation on this strategy will take place before this time.

We Asked

Between November and December 2018 we sought views on the proposed Vision and Strategy for the County Council’s Adults’ Services over the period 2019-2021.

We asked people for their views to make sure that the Vision and Strategy reflected the expectations of people who use our services, their families and carers, our partners, stakeholders and communities.  

The feedback from the engagement process formed an integral part of the Cabinet Member for Adults and Health’s decision to adopt the Vision and Strategy.

You Said

Overall the vision and strategy was welcomed by the 223 people who completed the survey. In general, they agreed that it presented the right approach and priorities for Adults’ Services over the period 2019-2021.

Individual responses to the survey highlighted a range of issues in relation to different parts of the Vision and Strategy and these were included in the comprehensive survey findings analysis report. This was published as one of the papers considered by the Cabinet Member for Adults and Health when making her decision to adopt the Vision and Strategy. The report can be accessed here.

We Did

Following the engagement period, the Vision and Strategy was revised to incorporate feedback from the survey.

The Cabinet Member for Adults and Health approved the adoption of the Vision and Strategy on 28 March 2019.

The Vision and Strategy is available here.

An easyread version of the Vision and Strategy is available here.

We Asked

We asked stakeholders for thier feedback on proposals to bring the MIG allowance for working age customers receiving County Council arranged care and support other than in a care home in line with the statutory minimum from April 2019.

The County Council consulted with customers who would be potentially impacted by this decision, Customer and Voluntary groups representing the cohort of customers potentially impacted, as well as seeking views from the wider community.

You Said

727 responses were received in relation to this consultation. The majority stated they would prefer the proposed change not to take place, as this would potentially increase the amount they would need to contrbute.

We Did

In December 2019, the Cabinet Member for Adults and Health  approved that the Minimum Income Guarantee for those working age adults who require a financial assessment of customer contributions who are receiving County Council arranged care and support other than in a care home, be reduced to bring it into line with the national statutory amounts with effect from 8th April 2019. For further details, please click on the link to the Minimum Income Guarantee for Working Age Adults - AH10(18/19) Decision Report.

We Asked

The County Council welcomed views on the best way of continuing to provide discretionary welfare assistance to households in crisis situations and the form this should take if there is to be a further reduction to the resources which may be available.   

You Said

Service users, residents, staff and partner organisations took part in this stakeholder engagement exercise and shared thier views regarding changes to the service in the light of a proposed reduction to the LAN budget from April 2019. 

We Did

The Cabinet Member for Adults and Health has approved a reduction in the budget for the LAN from £807,000 to £200,000 per annum from 2019/20 onwards together with a remodelling of the remaining service that:

  • Maintains support to Children and Family Centres that deliver the Council’s statutory duties to provide an early help offer.  Ensuring that the remaining offer is targeted.
  • Maintains support to foodbanks targeting individuals and families with the highest level of need.
  • Reduces the contribution to Citizens Advice, recognising that the Council provides other funding to this service, but accepting the importance of maintaining a specific targeted LAN offer focused on locally based ‘face to face’ services to the CA’s which already has extensive locations across the County.
  • Reduces the contribution to social enterprises.

Please click on the following link for further details about the Local Assistance Network (LAN) - AH12 (18/19)

We Asked

We asked for stakeholder views on the sustainability of the discretionary nature of many of the housing related support services the Council has provided up to this point.  We also asked for feedback on any impacts which might result from the Cabinet Member's approval of a process which could lead to the termination of any of the current housing support contracts with providers from April 2019 onwards.

You Said

We received 721 responses, and a range of stakeholders took part in this engagement exercise inlcuding service users(20%) , residents (52%) , staff (16%) and interested/partner organisations (12%).  Respondents were asked to share thier views regarding changes to the service in the light of a proposed reduction to the Housing Related Support budget from April 2019. 

We Did

Feedback from this process of engagement was used to inform funding decisions for these services in December 2018 and to plan for their impact.  In December 2018 the Cabinet Member for Adults and Health has approved  that:

1.   The County Council allocates a core budget of £4.6 million in 2019/20 and £2.3 million in 2020/21 for investment in Housing Related Support, this investment to be used to meet the Council’s statutory duties and address the risk that reducing targeted prevention will lead to increased demand pressure in other areas,  

2.   All current Housing Related Support Contracts to be terminated by 30th September 2019 and new contractual arrangements developed to commence on the 1st October 2019.   Additional assurance on the implementation period and impact mitigation will be provided through a continuous review process with providers and partners between January and September 2019 to ensure that the revised contracts are deliverable and the impact of these changes are minimised.  

3.   The County Council works closely with strategic partners, providers and stakeholders to remodel the service offer in line with statutory responsibilities, revised service priorities and the financial envelope.

 4.   The County Council will collaborate with the District and Borough Councils to facilitate a county wide Homelessness Reduction Strategy so that funding streams available from Central Government can be sourced.

Please click on the following link for further details about the  Housing Related Support - AH11(18/19) decision.

We Asked

The Community Safety & Wellbeing Team at West Sussex County Council launched two Cybercrime surveys in order to gather feedback about people’s perceptions and experiences of Cybercrime/online safety over the last 12 months. The ‘Personal Use’ Cybercrime survey was aimed at all West Sussex residents aged 18 or above, and received 519 responses. The ‘Business’ survey was aimed at managers and business owners, and received 13 responses. Both surveys ran for 5 weeks, from Monday the 15th of October, 2018, to Monday the 19th of November, 2018.

You Said

Top 3 Key Findings

-More than half of respondents to the personal use cybercrime survey have experienced an attempted Cyber-attack

-Roughly 30% of respondents do not feel confident in their knowledge of how to protect themselves against Cybercrime

-Only around a quarter of businesses surveyed have an information and cyber security policy in place

We Did

Since the surveys have taken place, we have stepped up the amount of information we are sharing with regards to Cybercrime through our E-newsletter, our twitter, and our page Staying Safe Online webpage accessible on the County Council website. The Community Safety & Wellbeing Team are working with partners to inform future online safety prevention work across the county, and will use the survey material to improve our services.

We Asked

The Community Safety & Wellbeing Team at West Sussex County Council launched two Cybercrime surveys in order to gather feedback about people’s perceptions and experiences of Cybercrime/online safety over the last 12 months. The ‘Personal Use’ Cybercrime survey was aimed at all West Sussex residents aged 18 or above, and received 519 responses. The ‘Business’ survey was aimed at managers and business owners, and received 13 responses. Both surveys ran for 5 weeks, from Monday the 15th of October, 2018, to Monday the 19th of November, 2018.

You Said

Top 3 Key Findings

-More than half of respondents to the personal use cybercrime survey have experienced an attempted Cyber-attack

-Roughly 30% of respondents do not feel confident in their knowledge of how to protect themselves against Cybercrime

-Only around a quarter of businesses surveyed have an information and cyber security policy in place

We Did

Since the surveys have taken place, we have stepped up the amount of information we are sharing with regards to Cybercrime through our E-newsletter, our twitter, and our page Staying Safe Online webpage accessible on the County Council website. The Community Safety & Wellbeing Team are working with partners to inform future online safety prevention work across the county, and will use the survey material to improve our services.

We Asked

We carried out a bus user survey asking for feedback about how you use our subsidised bus routes across the county.

Most bus services in West Sussex are commercially operated, but some routes receive county council funding to help them run. This was costing £2.57 million a year. In common with other local authorities across the country, we have to make difficult decisions as a result of ever-decreasing funding from central government to help pay for the services we provide.

You Said

There were 4,314 responses to the bus user survey, which helped identify any impact that users could face if the services were changed.

Your feedback helped us to help understand which services were of the greatest benefit to residents, so we could do everything possible to minimise the effect of the changes.

We Did

The council has now reviewed its supported bus services and reduced the total subsidy by £300,000 - to £2.27million. The planned changes are listed below, together with a list of alternative routes and services where available:

UPDATE: Changes have now been confirmed for most of the services listed above. These are summarised below, with links to the new timetables where available:

We will continue to work with local communities and partners to see what help can be provided for any affected residents who don’t have alternatives.

We would welcome hearing from any organisations who would like to be involved in finding alternative funding sources or providing community transport – please email buses@westsussex.gov.uk

 

We Asked

Following the first round of consultation, we reviewed feedback and carried out additional work to improve and refine the proposed masterplan.

The second round of consultation sought feedback on the changes made and further comments and suggestions regarding the wider proposals for the Horsham Enterprise Park.

You Said

  • Most participants were happy with the overall vision for a mixed-use site.
  • The retention of Building No.3 and the avenue of cedar trees were broadly welcomed.
  • Attendees of the drop-in consultation event were pleased to see further detail on proposals for traffic improvements.
  • Many suggested further consideration needed to be given to wider traffic impacts.
  • There was a broad desire to see a generous proportion of affordable homes provided on the site.
  • Many participants expressed a desire to see a footbridge across the railway line to improve connections from the site to Horsham Town Centre.

We Did

Masterplan Element - Employment Space

Feedback

There was a strong desire from participants for the site to be a space for businesses to scale up and grow.

WSCC Response

The project team has taken this on board and will ensure the site is promoted to attract innovative and modern businesses.

Masterplan Element - New Homes

Feedback

There was a desire to see a generous proportion of affordable homes and homes for older people included on the site, and a feeling that 300 homes are too many for the site.

WSCC Response

WSCC are committed to ensuring a policy compliant proportion of 35% affordable homes are included within the residential development.

WSCC acknowledges the importance of providing purpose-built homes for older people, and this will be considered as part of future detailed planning application for the site.

The figure of up to 300 homes for the site is an outline figure, which could potentially be lower at detailed stage. WSCC will continue to take this into consideration.

Masterplan Element - Community Hub

Feedback

Participants were keen for the community hub to be open and usable by the existing community as well as future residents and businesses.

WSCC Response

The project team have explored possibilities for additional uses on the site. This includes the possibility to provide space for a crèche or nursery to provide on-site child care.

Masterplan Element - Traffic and Transport

Feedback

Concerns were expressed by many participants that surrounding traffic infrastructure would struggle to cope with the increased pressure from the development.

WSCC Response

The project team have carried out further work as part of a Transport Assessment, which considers the following:

  • Mitigation and contributions have been identified for two junctions in close proximity to the site.
  • A new shared use pedestrian/cycle path will be provided on Parsonage Road and continuous footways across the two site accesses to support sustainable journeys to and from the site. Moreover, movements by pedestrians and cyclists will be prioritised within the site.
  • Parking provision aiming to meet the relevant levels set out in WSCC’s Parking Supplementary Planning Document or future iterations of the Transport Assessment.
  • A mitigation approach, agreed by the Highway Authority, which includes junction improvements to be funded through the Community Infrastructure Levy, and cycling improvements.
  • Construction Traffic Management Plans, to be submitted at relevant detailed planning stages. At this stage, it is suggested that construction traffic should avoid routing via Wimblehurst Road.
  • Road safety audits of the two site accesses are proposed to be undertaken and secured by planning conditions.

Masterplan Element - Landscape and Open Space

Feedback

The importance of the tree-lined avenue leading up to the retained Building No.3 was often raised in feedback.

WSCC Response

The latest masterplan proposes the addition of new trees to complete the missing section of this avenue. A further tree-lined avenue is proposed to the rear of the building in the employment area.

Key buildings have been relocated on the masterplan to enclose views and ensure a greater buffer between the site and Parsonage Road.

We Asked

On 8th October 2018 a four week consultation was launched on proposals to expand Manor Green Primary to accommodate the rising demand for pupil places. We sought feedback from education stakeholders in the area, parents, the wider school community, local councils, neighbouring authorities, SEN Forums, amongst others on whether this would be welcomed.

You Said

Seventy nine responses were received to an online survey, 75 of whom supported the proposals.  Responses were mainly from parents of pupils at the school and local residents.  Proposals were also well received in the local press.  Respondents commented that the expanded numbers need to be supported by increased staffing and consideration given to access arrangements.

We Did

The Cabinet Member has agreed funding for a permanent expansion of the building to accommodate a further 36 pupils including two extra classrooms and hoist and hygiene facilities for children with complex needs. Capital investment in the new facilities and equipment is likely to be in the order of £1m. Extra revenue funding is made available for teaching and learning staff based on additional numbers.

We Asked

We asked our residents, businesses, and local communities to tell us whether or not they agreed with the design proposals for the A2300.

The public engagement questionnaire used for this project  included questions on a series of topics, such as:

  • Views on the proposals;
  • The main purpose of respondents’ journeys along the A2300
  • The mode of transport most frequently used to travel along/across the A2300; and
  • Other demographic information.

 

You Said

More than 320 visitors attended the five public events held across Burgess Hill.  Overall, a total of 212 responses were received. Of these, around three-quarters (156, 74%) were 4.1.1received through the online survey and just over a quarter (56, 26%) were letters or emails. Of the responses received, 20 were from stakeholders including local authorities, environment and representative groups, landowners and businesses.

The majority of respondents did not support the Phase 1 design proposals. Overall, 135 (71%) respondents either strongly disagree or disagree with the proposals, while 35 (18%)either strongly agree or agree. A further 20 respondents (11%) neither agree nor disagree.

When asked to share thier reasons for not supporting the proposals, the most frequently occurring area of comment was the lack of crossing provision for people walking, cycling and horse riding (29 general comments, 12 specifically relating to the lack of crossings for horses, 8 specifically on the lack of crossings for cyclists).

Please see the Results Section below for a more detailed summary of responses.

We Did

We are progressing the next stage of scheme design development work at present and plan to submit the full business case to central government later this year for consideration and approval. Once approved, it is anticipated that the construction of the scheme will begin early next year.

We Asked

During the first consultation round we asked for your views on the various aspects of the proposals for redevelopment, including the mix of housing, business space, community facilities and the local transport infrastructure. We also invited general reflections and comments on the illustrative masterplan.  

You Said

Thank you to all those who responded during the first consultation round, whether you attended a drop-in exhibition or shared your reflections through the online and postal survey.

We Did

All comments received during the first consultation round are being collated and reviewed, and we will use them to inform the next stage of the planning process and to update the proposed masterplan.

We are opening a second consultation round, to run 30th October to 16th November inclusive, during which we will be inviting comments on the revised plans. The revised plans will be displayed at a drop-in exhibition on 30th October, 12 noon to 8pm at The Holbrook Club, North Heath Lane, Horsham, RH12 5PJ (see event calendar for more information).

Visit the webpages for the second round of the consultation, to find out about the event and other ways to view the revised proposals, and to complete the online survey on the updated proposals from 30th October -16th November:

https://haveyoursay.westsussex.gov.uk/former-novartis-site/round2                    

 

We Asked

We asked all the frontagers of Frith Road, Westloats Lane south of Collyer Avenue, Applegate Way, Westloats Gardens, Pendleton Place, Simmons Gardens, and Farrah Close about proposals to introduce traffic calming in the Frith Road between Pevensey Road and Gravits Lane in the form of three pairs of speed cushions and a raised table at the junction of Gravits Lane itself.

You Said

Feedback from the above frontager consultation was as follows:

Summary total :

In Favour of 1) Speed cushions          = 30;   against  = 6.

In Favour of 2) Raised table junction  = 34;   against = 3.

Total responses 45 from 300  = 15%.

This seems a considerable proportion in favour and we are now going to proceed to Statutory Public Consultation between 22nd November to 13th December 2018.

We Did

The above responses indicated significant frontager support and we proceeded to Statutory Public Consultation between 22nd November and 13th December 2018 and as a result received one objection and one comment of support. Under delegated powers the Local Member indicated in January 2019 his continued support for the propsals for Speed Cushions and a Raised Table Junction to go ahead. This scheme is currently programmed for installation in the present Financial Year i.e. between April 2019 and March 2020.

We Asked

We believe that by bringing together services under one roof we will be able to provide a more efficient, effective and sustainable service. We aksed you for your ideas and opinions about potentially working together with others to do this.

You Said

From the feedback of 115 online respondents:

  • 60.87% of online respondents agreed with bringing the Children and Family Centre into Worthing Library.
  • 62.61% of online respondents agreed with bringing the Find It Out Centre into Worthing Library. 
  • 60% of online respondents agreed with bringing in the Registration Services into Worthing Library.

You told us some of benefits of doing this were:

  • "Sounds really sensible. Opportunity to improve broader access to direct services”
  • “We appreciate the opportunity to discuss this- feels like you really care!”
  • “Good idea to protect services lots under one roof is good”

You told us some of your concerns which were:

  • Outdoor space for the Children and Family Centre
  • Reduced book stock in the library
  • Issues with noise

We Did

We have addressed concerns raised in the pre-engagement consultation and outlined our prosalsfor a community hub in the second phase of this consultation.  Answers to many of the queries raised were answered in the 'related documents' section of Phase 2 of this consultation, which also inlcuded artist impressions of what a new hub could look like. 

We Asked

West Sussex County Council is bringing forward proposals on behalf of the One Public Estate (OPE) West Sussex partnership to relocate Horsham Fire Station to a site on the A24 at Highwood.

This project will also deliver a blue-light satellite station close to Horsham town centre to provide facilities for an on-call fire engine and potentially facilities for South East Coast Ambulance Service.

In autumn 2018, the service undertook a public consultation encouraging comments and suggestions on the proposed relocation and any other issues which respondents considered should be taken into account.

You Said

A total of 169 responses were received in the public consultation.

The majority of responses received – 113 – were from people who identified themselves as Horsham residents or who worked in the town. In addition five comments were received from people who said they worked for West Sussex Fire & Rescue Service.

  • The majority of respondents – 102 – welcomed the fire station relocation noting it will provide modern facilities and the location close to the A24 was a good move.
  • Of the negative comments – 36 – primary concerns centred around the noise and traffic levels, questioning the need to move the current station and impact on neighbours.
  • Of those who said they were neutral/not sure – some respondents said they required more information to be able to come to a judgement, location and questioned the need to move.

 

We Did

Having considered the feedback from the consultation, a decision was agreed to allocate capital to this project to progress through detailed design to Planning.

A full business case will be brought through WSCC governance for the majority of the funding at the end of this phase, once the design is fixed and greater cost certainty established.

For more information on this project and other OPE projects see https://www.westsussex.gov.uk/about-the-council/how-the-council-works/partnership-work/transforming-public-buildings-and-land-one-public-estate/#projects.

 

We Asked

For your feedback on the development of the Crawley Growth Programme’s  Eastern and Station gateway projects. Engagement was undertaken between May and July 2018 to inform the public and key stakeholders of the proposed improvements within these schemes. The events presented the early feasibility designs ahead of moving forward to preliminary design stage, in preparation of tendering for a Design and Build contractor to deliver the two schemes.

We asked for your feedback and an indication of whether there was support for the schemes.

You Said

You said:-

  • There is clear majority support for the proposals.
  • Sustainable transport improvements are key areas of interest and concern.
  • Accessibility and pedestrian friendly features are important
  • Green spaces/greenery should be protected and aspired to within the plans.
  • Crawley bus station needs improvement and better waiting facilities

We Did

The comments and feedback were considered by the design team and the design response is below.  The full report can be viewed via the link provided at the bottom fo the consultation page.

We Asked

We conducted two online surveys that ran from 21 May 2018 to 22 July 2018. One was a general survey and the other was aimed at care and support providers.

The survey asked questions to help us with our current review of the Dementia Framework West Sussex.  The review was to help us identify whether we are achieving our outcomes and help us to plan our next steps to ensure people in West Sussex living with dementia and their families are supported to live well.

 

You Said

Thank you to all of the people that completed the survey. We received 190 responses in total. 149 people completed the general survey. Of those 41% (61) were a family or friend carer for someone with dementia, 3% (6) people had dementia themselves. 41 responses were received for the survey aimed at care and support providers.

Some of the highlights were:

  • 76% of you agreed that a ‘one stop shop’ for information and advice, where it was all located in one place, would make it easier to find information advice and information, whilst 63% agreed that more promotion of where to locate information would be beneficial.
  • 72% of you felt that better communication between services would improve care and support.
  • 51% of you would benefit from help in understanding how to manage a crisis.
  • You said you wanted more staff training on how to support people with learning disabilities who develop dementia and their families.
  • 25% of carers did not get a break from their caring role.
    • You said you wanted to see communities that were more accepting and understanding of the person living with dementia.
    • You said you wanted to see an expansion of dementia friendly communities particularly in more isolated, rural communities. 
  • Care and support providers offered a range of views on the unmet needs in West Sussex, including the following common themes
    • Services and support for diverse communities.
    • Accessible, affordable transport.
    • Effective coordination of information and advice.
    • Funding.
    • A general lack of services to support carers in their difficult roles, including the provision of respite opportunities and easily accessible information and advice.

 

We Did

We have collated the results from the surveys and will use them to inform the full review and refresh of the Dementia Framework.

The refreshed Dementia Framework will be launched in Spring 2020.

We Asked

We aksed you to tell us which of the priorities and related service areas outlined in the West Sussex Plan were most important to you going forward:.

  • giving our children and young people the best start in life
  • ensuring West Sussex is a prosperous place
  • our communities being strong, safe and sustainable
  • supporting you in later life to remain independent
  • being a council that works for our communities.

We also asked you to have your say on potential Council Tax rates from 2019/20 and 2020/21, as well as a range of other community and services issues, such as crime, recycling and parks.

You Said

2136 people participated in the What Matters To You Survey this year, with a further 253 people taking part in the Children and Young People's version, and a further 15 people completed the Easy Read version,  Key findings inlcude:

  • Out of our five main priorities, a majority of residents felt that 'A Strong, Safe and Sustainable Place' was the most important;
  • 35% of those surveyed thought that West Sussex County Council provides good value for money;
  • 43% were satisfied with county council services;
  • Overall support for a future increase in council tax remains high.

For a more detailed analysis of all the 2018 What Matters To You Survey results, please view the files we have shared in the Results Section.

We Did

Following the recent survey we shared about keeping you informed on our budget, last week West Sussex County Council approved a net expenditure of £575.5 million to deliver key services for all the communities of West Sussex...

Here are the budget highlights:

The budget includes significant investments to support the delivery of the five key priority areas of the West Sussex Plan:

  • £6.1 million additional new investment in Children and Young People’s services.
  • £7.3 million investment in Adults and Health.
  • Additional investment in Special Support Centres to help to keep students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) in mainstream schools with their peers and in their local area.
  • £3 million additional investment in extra care schemes to help keep older people living independently for longer.
  • £44.5 million investment in a sustainable energy programme which includes the installation of solar farms and battery storage on unused council land.
  • £5 million programme to create community hubs and protect key services by bringing them together under one roof.
  • £13.8 million investment in corporate and fire fleet vehicles and £1.8 million in specialist fire equipment to support our Fire and Rescue Service.
  • £22.5 million investment in digital infrastructure supporting businesses and rural communities.

Your council tax will increase by 4.99%...

Since 2010, the council has saved more than £200m and in the same period, government funding has been cut by £145m. The county council faced a challenging financial gap of £45.4m for 2019/20 alone, due to increasing demand on social care services and a continued reduction in central government funding. As a result, it identified £23.4m of savings across a number of services.

The remaining amount has been found through a council tax increase of 4.99% which includes a dedicated 2% to fund adult social care. This increase means an additional £1.27 per week for the average Band D household. 

Further information...

Please visit our budget page for more details.