We Asked, You Said, We Did

Below are some of the issues we have recently consulted on and their outcomes.

We Asked

We conducted an online resident survey from 3rd December 2018 to 11th January 2019, asking 11 questions to give a flavour of what our residents currently think about EVs and what they would like the charging infrastructure to look like across the county in the future.

You Said

Thank you to all of the people that completed the survey. We received 1339 responses in total.

Some of the highlights are:

  • 60% of you would like to own an electric car
  • 84% of you want to charge at home
  • 60% of you want to charge at destinations
  • Lack of public charging is preventing / discouraging 57% of you switching
  • Cost of EV cars is  preventing / discouraging 55% of you switching
  • 36% of you would be willing to pay more to charge on a public network than at home.

We Did

All the results received are being collated and reviewed, and we will use them to inform the next stage of the strategy development.

We are aiming to have a final strategy drafted for approval by November 2019. An additional public consultation on this strategy will take place before this time.

We Asked

We carried out a bus user survey asking for feedback about how you use our subsidised bus routes across the county.

Most bus services in West Sussex are commercially operated, but some routes receive county council funding to help them run. This was costing £2.57 million a year. In common with other local authorities across the country, we have to make difficult decisions as a result of ever-decreasing funding from central government to help pay for the services we provide.

You Said

There were 4,314 responses to the bus user survey, which helped identify any impact that users could face if the services were changed.

Your feedback helped us to help understand which services were of the greatest benefit to residents, so we could do everything possible to minimise the effect of the changes.

We Did

The council has now reviewed its supported bus services and reduced the total subsidy by £300,000 - to £2.27million. The planned changes are listed below:

In the majority of cases, if a route will no longer include particular roads, an alternative bus will be available for people use fairly nearby.

We will be working with local communities to see what help can be provided for any affected residents who don’t have alternatives before the changes happen.

We would welcome hearing from any organisations who would like to be involved in finding alternative funding sources or providing community transport – please email buses@westsussex.gov.uk

The council is now agreeing the exact dates that services will change, however there will be no changes made before April 2019. 

We Asked

Following the first round of consultation, we reviewed feedback and carried out additional work to improve and refine the proposed masterplan.

The second round of consultation sought feedback on the changes made and further comments and suggestions regarding the wider proposals for the Horsham Enterprise Park.

You Said

  • Most participants were happy with the overall vision for a mixed-use site.
  • The retention of Building No.3 and the avenue of cedar trees were broadly welcomed.
  • Attendees of the drop-in consultation event were pleased to see further detail on proposals for traffic improvements.
  • Many suggested further consideration needed to be given to wider traffic impacts.
  • There was a broad desire to see a generous proportion of affordable homes provided on the site.
  • Many participants expressed a desire to see a footbridge across the railway line to improve connections from the site to Horsham Town Centre.

We Did

Masterplan Element - Employment Space

Feedback

There was a strong desire from participants for the site to be a space for businesses to scale up and grow.

WSCC Response

The project team has taken this on board and will ensure the site is promoted to attract innovative and modern businesses.

Masterplan Element - New Homes

Feedback

There was a desire to see a generous proportion of affordable homes and homes for older people included on the site, and a feeling that 300 homes are too many for the site.

WSCC Response

WSCC are committed to ensuring a policy compliant proportion of 35% affordable homes are included within the residential development.

WSCC acknowledges the importance of providing purpose-built homes for older people, and this will be considered as part of future detailed planning application for the site.

The figure of up to 300 homes for the site is an outline figure, which could potentially be lower at detailed stage. WSCC will continue to take this into consideration.

Masterplan Element - Community Hub

Feedback

Participants were keen for the community hub to be open and usable by the existing community as well as future residents and businesses.

WSCC Response

The project team have explored possibilities for additional uses on the site. This includes the possibility to provide space for a crèche or nursery to provide on-site child care.

Masterplan Element - Traffic and Transport

Feedback

Concerns were expressed by many participants that surrounding traffic infrastructure would struggle to cope with the increased pressure from the development.

WSCC Response

The project team have carried out further work as part of a Transport Assessment, which considers the following:

  • Mitigation and contributions have been identified for two junctions in close proximity to the site.
  • A new shared use pedestrian/cycle path will be provided on Parsonage Road and continuous footways across the two site accesses to support sustainable journeys to and from the site. Moreover, movements by pedestrians and cyclists will be prioritised within the site.
  • Parking provision aiming to meet the relevant levels set out in WSCC’s Parking Supplementary Planning Document or future iterations of the Transport Assessment.
  • A mitigation approach, agreed by the Highway Authority, which includes junction improvements to be funded through the Community Infrastructure Levy, and cycling improvements.
  • Construction Traffic Management Plans, to be submitted at relevant detailed planning stages. At this stage, it is suggested that construction traffic should avoid routing via Wimblehurst Road.
  • Road safety audits of the two site accesses are proposed to be undertaken and secured by planning conditions.

Masterplan Element - Landscape and Open Space

Feedback

The importance of the tree-lined avenue leading up to the retained Building No.3 was often raised in feedback.

WSCC Response

The latest masterplan proposes the addition of new trees to complete the missing section of this avenue. A further tree-lined avenue is proposed to the rear of the building in the employment area.

Key buildings have been relocated on the masterplan to enclose views and ensure a greater buffer between the site and Parsonage Road.

We Asked

During the first consultation round we asked for your views on the various aspects of the proposals for redevelopment, including the mix of housing, business space, community facilities and the local transport infrastructure. We also invited general reflections and comments on the illustrative masterplan.  

You Said

Thank you to all those who responded during the first consultation round, whether you attended a drop-in exhibition or shared your reflections through the online and postal survey.

We Did

All comments received during the first consultation round are being collated and reviewed, and we will use them to inform the next stage of the planning process and to update the proposed masterplan.

We are opening a second consultation round, to run 30th October to 16th November inclusive, during which we will be inviting comments on the revised plans. The revised plans will be displayed at a drop-in exhibition on 30th October, 12 noon to 8pm at The Holbrook Club, North Heath Lane, Horsham, RH12 5PJ (see event calendar for more information).

Visit the webpages for the second round of the consultation, to find out about the event and other ways to view the revised proposals, and to complete the online survey on the updated proposals from 30th October -16th November:

https://haveyoursay.westsussex.gov.uk/former-novartis-site/round2                    

 

We Asked

For your feedback on the development of the Crawley Growth Programme’s  Eastern and Station gateway projects. Engagement was undertaken between May and July 2018 to inform the public and key stakeholders of the proposed improvements within these schemes. The events presented the early feasibility designs ahead of moving forward to preliminary design stage, in preparation of tendering for a Design and Build contractor to deliver the two schemes.

We asked for your feedback and an indication of whether there was support for the schemes.

You Said

You said:-

  • There is clear majority support for the proposals.
  • Sustainable transport improvements are key areas of interest and concern.
  • Accessibility and pedestrian friendly features are important
  • Green spaces/greenery should be protected and aspired to within the plans.
  • Crawley bus station needs improvement and better waiting facilities

We Did

The comments and feedback were considered by the design team and the design response is below.  The full report can be viewed via the link provided at the bottom fo the consultation page.

We Asked

We conducted two online surveys that ran from 21 May 2018 to 22 July 2018. One was a general survey and the other was aimed at care and support providers.

The survey asked questions to help us with our current review of the Dementia Framework West Sussex.  The review was to help us identify whether we are achieving our outcomes and help us to plan our next steps to ensure people in West Sussex living with dementia and their families are supported to live well.

 

You Said

Thank you to all of the people that completed the survey. We received 190 responses in total. 149 people completed the general survey. Of those 41% (61) were a family or friend carer for someone with dementia, 3% (6) people had dementia themselves. 41 responses were received for the survey aimed at care and support providers.

Some of the highlights were:

  • 76% of you agreed that a ‘one stop shop’ for information and advice, where it was all located in one place, would make it easier to find information advice and information, whilst 63% agreed that more promotion of where to locate information would be beneficial.
  • 72% of you felt that better communication between services would improve care and support.
  • 51% of you would benefit from help in understanding how to manage a crisis.
  • You said you wanted more staff training on how to support people with learning disabilities who develop dementia and their families.
  • 25% of carers did not get a break from their caring role.
    • You said you wanted to see communities that were more accepting and understanding of the person living with dementia.
    • You said you wanted to see an expansion of dementia friendly communities particularly in more isolated, rural communities. 
  • Care and support providers offered a range of views on the unmet needs in West Sussex, including the following common themes
    • Services and support for diverse communities.
    • Accessible, affordable transport.
    • Effective coordination of information and advice.
    • Funding.
    • A general lack of services to support carers in their difficult roles, including the provision of respite opportunities and easily accessible information and advice.

 

We Did

We have collated the results from the surveys and will use them to inform the full review and refresh of the Dementia Framework.

The refreshed Dementia Framework will be launched in Spring 2020.

We Asked

We aksed you to tell us which of the priorities and related service areas outlined in the West Sussex Plan were most important to you going forward:.

  • giving our children and young people the best start in life
  • ensuring West Sussex is a prosperous place
  • our communities being strong, safe and sustainable
  • supporting you in later life to remain independent
  • being a council that works for our communities.

We also asked you to have your say on potential Council Tax rates from 2019/20 and 2020/21, as well as a range of other community and services issues, such as crime, recycling and parks.

You Said

2136 people participated in the What Matters To You Survey this year, with a further 253 people taking part in the Children and Young People's version, and a further 15 people completed the Easy Read version,  Key findings inlcude:

  • Out of our five main priorities, a majority of residents felt that 'A Strong, Safe and Sustainable Place' was the most important;
  • 35% of those surveyed thought that West Sussex County Council provides good value for money;
  • 43% were satisfied with county council services;
  • Overall support for a future increase in council tax remains high.

For a more detailed analysis of all the 2018 What Matters To You Survey results, please view the files we have shared in the Results Section.

We Did

Following the recent survey we shared about keeping you informed on our budget, last week West Sussex County Council approved a net expenditure of £575.5 million to deliver key services for all the communities of West Sussex...

Here are the budget highlights:

The budget includes significant investments to support the delivery of the five key priority areas of the West Sussex Plan:

  • £6.1 million additional new investment in Children and Young People’s services.
  • £7.3 million investment in Adults and Health.
  • Additional investment in Special Support Centres to help to keep students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) in mainstream schools with their peers and in their local area.
  • £3 million additional investment in extra care schemes to help keep older people living independently for longer.
  • £44.5 million investment in a sustainable energy programme which includes the installation of solar farms and battery storage on unused council land.
  • £5 million programme to create community hubs and protect key services by bringing them together under one roof.
  • £13.8 million investment in corporate and fire fleet vehicles and £1.8 million in specialist fire equipment to support our Fire and Rescue Service.
  • £22.5 million investment in digital infrastructure supporting businesses and rural communities.

Your council tax will increase by 4.99%...

Since 2010, the council has saved more than £200m and in the same period, government funding has been cut by £145m. The county council faced a challenging financial gap of £45.4m for 2019/20 alone, due to increasing demand on social care services and a continued reduction in central government funding. As a result, it identified £23.4m of savings across a number of services.

The remaining amount has been found through a council tax increase of 4.99% which includes a dedicated 2% to fund adult social care. This increase means an additional £1.27 per week for the average Band D household. 

Further information...

Please visit our budget page for more details.

We Asked

We aksed you to tell us which of the priorities and related service areas outlined in the West Sussex Plan were most important to you going forward:.

  • giving our children and young people the best start in life
  • ensuring West Sussex is a prosperous place
  • our communities being strong, safe and sustainable
  • supporting you in later life to remain independent
  • being a council that works for our communities.

We also asked you to have your say on potential Council Tax rates from 2019/20 and 2020/21, as well as a range of other community and services issues, such as crime, recycling and parks.

You Said

2136 people participated in the What Matters To You Survey this year, with a further 253 people taking part in the Children and Young People's version, and a further 15 people completed the Easy Read version,  Key findings inlcude:

  • Out of our five main priorities, a majority of residents felt that 'A Strong, Safe and Sustainable Place' was the most important;
  • 35% of those surveyed thought that West Sussex County Council provides good value for money;
  • 43% were satisfied with county council services;
  • Overall support for a future increase in council tax remains high.

For a more detailed analysis of all the 2018 What Matters To You Survey results, please view the files we have shared in the Results Section

We Did

Following the recent survey we shared about keeping you informed on our budget, last week West Sussex County Council approved a net expenditure of £575.5 million to deliver key services for all the communities of West Sussex...

Here are the budget highlights:

The budget includes significant investments to support the delivery of the five key priority areas of the West Sussex Plan:

  • £6.1 million additional new investment in Children and Young People’s services.
  • £7.3 million investment in Adults and Health.
  • Additional investment in Special Support Centres to help to keep students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) in mainstream schools with their peers and in their local area.
  • £3 million additional investment in extra care schemes to help keep older people living independently for longer.
  • £44.5 million investment in a sustainable energy programme which includes the installation of solar farms and battery storage on unused council land.
  • £5 million programme to create community hubs and protect key services by bringing them together under one roof.
  • £13.8 million investment in corporate and fire fleet vehicles and £1.8 million in specialist fire equipment to support our Fire and Rescue Service.
  • £22.5 million investment in digital infrastructure supporting businesses and rural communities.

Your council tax will increase by 4.99%...

Since 2010, the council has saved more than £200m and in the same period, government funding has been cut by £145m. The county council faced a challenging financial gap of £45.4m for 2019/20 alone, due to increasing demand on social care services and a continued reduction in central government funding. As a result, it identified £23.4m of savings across a number of services.

The remaining amount has been found through a council tax increase of 4.99% which includes a dedicated 2% to fund adult social care. This increase means an additional £1.27 per week for the average Band D household. 

Further information...

Please visit our budget page for more details.

We Asked

We aksed you to tell us which of the priorities and related service areas outlined in the West Sussex Plan were most important to you going forward:.

  • giving our children and young people the best start in life
  • ensuring West Sussex is a prosperous place
  • our communities being strong, safe and sustainable
  • supporting you in later life to remain independent
  • being a council that works for our communities.

We also asked you to have your say on potential Council Tax rates from 2019/20 and 2020/21, as well as a range of other community and services issues, such as crime, recycling and parks.

You Said

2136 people participated in the What Matters To You Survey this year, with a further 253 people taking part in the Children and Young People's version, and a further 15 people completed the Easy Read version,  Key findings inlcude:

  • Out of our five main priorities, a majority of residents felt that 'A Strong, Safe and Sustainable Place' was the most important;
  • 35% of those surveyed thought that West Sussex County Council provides good value for money;
  • 43% were satisfied with county council services;
  • Overall support for a future increase in council tax remains high.

For a more detailed analysis of all the 2018 What Matters To You Survey results, please view the files we have shared in the Results Section.

We Did

Following the recent survey we shared about keeping you informed on our budget, last week West Sussex County Council approved a net expenditure of £575.5 million to deliver key services for all the communities of West Sussex...

Here are the budget highlights:

The budget includes significant investments to support the delivery of the five key priority areas of the West Sussex Plan:

  • £6.1 million additional new investment in Children and Young People’s services.
  • £7.3 million investment in Adults and Health.
  • Additional investment in Special Support Centres to help to keep students with Special Educational Needs and Disabilities (SEND) in mainstream schools with their peers and in their local area.
  • £3 million additional investment in extra care schemes to help keep older people living independently for longer.
  • £44.5 million investment in a sustainable energy programme which includes the installation of solar farms and battery storage on unused council land.
  • £5 million programme to create community hubs and protect key services by bringing them together under one roof.
  • £13.8 million investment in corporate and fire fleet vehicles and £1.8 million in specialist fire equipment to support our Fire and Rescue Service.
  • £22.5 million investment in digital infrastructure supporting businesses and rural communities.

Your council tax will increase by 4.99%...

Since 2010, the council has saved more than £200m and in the same period, government funding has been cut by £145m. The county council faced a challenging financial gap of £45.4m for 2019/20 alone, due to increasing demand on social care services and a continued reduction in central government funding. As a result, it identified £23.4m of savings across a number of services.

The remaining amount has been found through a council tax increase of 4.99% which includes a dedicated 2% to fund adult social care. This increase means an additional £1.27 per week for the average Band D household. 

Further information...

Please visit our budget page for more details.

We Asked

For your comments on a four page document that outlined the County Council’s Vision, Principles and Values for Education in West Sussex.

The document proposed aims and objectives for School Organisation and School Improvement which the Education and Skills Directorate will focus on over the next four years. It suggested an approach to build sustainable capacity for school places and incorporated the policy to challenge and support schools to improve by targeting resources, broadening the services that are traded and enabling school-to-school support.

You Said

  • You broadly supported the Vision, Principles and Values.
  • You were concerned about what it might mean for smaller schools in rural parts of West Sussex and wanted more explanation and clarification about what this will mean in practice.
  • You told us how much you value the School Improvement Team, but had concerns about visits reducing or a model that relied on school-to-school support.

 

We Did

  1. Had additional discussions with School Leaders and Governors on the detail to respond to concerns raised during the consultation period.
  2. Considered all consultation responses and feedback and the final strategy and its implementation will; 
  • Refine our approach to focus on the sustainablity of schools in the rural localities.
  • Increase the minimum number of contacts fro the School Improvment Team to 'good' or 'outstanding' schools.
  • Develop school-to-school suport over time and in partnership. 

We Asked

We asked all the frontagers of Queens Road, Church Avenue, Gordon Road and Bridge Road about proposals to introduce speed cushions in Queens Road, a 20mph speed limit in all the roads and a 7.5 tonne weight restriction (except for access) in Queens Road between Mill Green Road and Bridge Road.

You Said

As a result of distributing around 450 letters and drawings and an online Have Your Say webpage we received 88 replies.

From those:

- Regarding the proposed speed cushions, 69 were in favour and 19 against;

- Regarding the 20mph speed limit, 75 were in favour and 13 were against;

- Regarding the 7.5 tonne weight restriction (except for access), 83 were in favour and 5 were against.

(1 paper was returned blank)

 

We Did

These responses indicate significant frontager support and as such we are proceeding to Statutory Public Consultation so that we may introduce these measures subject to receiving any further comments or objections from our statutory public consultees or the wider public. The process of Statutory Public Consultation is expected to happen over the next few months and any measures would be introduced in the coming financial year i.e. between April 2019 and March 2020.

We Asked

We asked for your feedback on the proposed objectives and priorities for the council’s new Bus Strategy and whether you thought there was anything else we should include.

You Said

There were 1,302 responses to the consultation, with over 80% agreement for each of the proposed objectives and an average of 87% agreement overall.

The following priorities were ranked as being the most important to you:

  1. Prioritise investment in good accessible bus infrastructure for bus users
  2. Give buses priority over other travel modes when congestion occurs
  3. Work with all tiers of Local Government in seeking funding for prioritised local bus and community transport services

Many of you also provided additional comments and feedback as to what else you would like to see included in the Bus Strategy.

You can see a summary of the results and findings here.

We Did

Your comments and feedback are currently being considered and taken into account for the new West Sussex Bus Strategy for 2018-2026, which will be published soon.

We Asked

Residents have shared their views on proposals to change West Sussex County Council’s Adults’ in-house social care services. The county council launched its Choices for the Future survey at the beginning of May to offer residents, staff, people who use the services and their families and carer’s the opportunity to have their say on the future model of services.

 

You Said

More than 450 people have completed the survey with 92% of those who took part supporting the principles of the service proposals. 46% of respondents agreed with the detailed proposals themselves, whilst 37% disagreed, and the remaining 17% were unsure.

 In addition to the survey, 190 people attended 14 sessions to hear the views of families and carers. A further 20 sessions was held with 210 current users of the in-house services.

The documents below detail the findings from the engagement on the service proposals described in the Choices for the Future booklet. These documents are:

•        a summary report;

•        appendix A – detailed analysis of the public survey and;

•        appendix B – set of frequently asked questions (FAQ’s)  

Please take a look at the report booklet which describes the main findings of the recent period of engagement. This is also available at the bottom of this page under 'related documents' along with a downloadable copy of the survey.

Your browser does not support inline PDF viewing.Please download the PDF.

We Did

The survey results were discussed twice at the Heath and Social Care Board, after which a decision was made on 30th October 2018.  The Cabinet Member for Adults and Health approved:

1) The following day ser vice changes are implemented:

  • transfer existing services at Glen Vue and maidenbower to either Shaw Healthcare services (Deerswood and Burle's Wood) or through other providers/individual solutions as identified (complete by June 2019);
  • move provision at teh Wrenford Centre to the Chestnuts Day Centre and Judith Adams sites (complte b June 2019);
  • move provision at Coastal Enterprise, Coastal Workshop Rustington and oaks inot Lauresl, Rowans and Glebelands (complete b March 2020);
  • move the day service at new Tyne into the Rowards (complete by March 2020);
  • move provision at the Pines to Laurels, Rowans and Glebelands (by November 2020).

2) The prepareation of a plan b summer 2019 for the 24hr/residential services, to inlcude the rebuild of the Pines and Strawford day centres, and relocation of the Burnside day service to an alternative site

3) That a consultation on any proposed implementation of a reconfigured 24hr residential service provision incofporateing two new day oppoorunity sites is carried out.  To commence in the 2019 to 2020 budget year.

Further details and additional documents accompanying this decision can be found here.

 

We Asked

The purpose of the consultation was to:

  • Gain a better understanding of the VCS in West Sussex
  • Gain a deeper insight into the needs of the Voluntary Community Sector (VCS)
  • Gather your views on the current Voluntary Community Sector Infrastructure support
  • Understand more about the challenges that the VCS are facing. 

You Said

Survey was live from 19th February to 16th March.  We received 163 responses from a range of organisations. Your greatest challenges were:

  • Funding
  • Recruitment and retention of volunteers
  • Keeping track of changes in policy and/or legislation
  • Engagement with Statutory Sector eg WSCC, D&B’s, NHS
  • Premises
  • Skills and Training

We Did

The results are part of the ongoing consultation process with the Voluntary Community Sector and were shared at the VCS Engagement Event in April as well as sharing findings with the Infrastructure Organisations.    Following on from the VCS Engagement Event and survey results, a series of focus groups will be set up on the following themes: 

  • Volunteering
  • Partnerships and networking
  • Voice and communications
  • Funding
  • Training, governance and voluntary sector advice

We are hoping that group discussions on the above topics will take place over the coming months looking at different issues and identifying solutions that will make a positive difference going forward.

We Asked

Public examination hearings were held for the West Sussex Joint Minerals Local Plan in September 2017. During the hearings, discussions revealed a number of modifications to the Plan were likely to be necessary before the Planning Inspector could confirm the Plan as sound and legally compliant.  We published a schedule of proposed modifications, inviting formal representations on their soundness, in January 2018.

You Said

In total 36 organisations or individuals submitted a total of 123 representations on the proposed modifications. Following the representations period, the representations were submitted to the Planning Inspector for his review.  The inspector concluded that there were no further hearing sessions required once he had reviewed the representations. The Inspector issued his final report and a final schedule of modifications on 27 May 2018, confirming that, with the modifications, the Plan would be considered to be sound, and could be adopted.

We Did

The Joint Minerals Local Plan was formally adopted by the Authorities in July 2018, and now forms part of the Development Plan for West Sussex.  The Plan can be seen on the following webpages: www.westsussex.gov.uk/mwdf.

We Asked

We asked for your feedback on the proposal to amend the number of places West Sussex County Council commissions at the Special Support Centre at Hazelwick School. The proposal aligned provision more closely with need and made best use of available funding.

You Said

43 of you took part in the consultation and fed back your views on the proposal via the online survey. 42 respondents were opposed to the proposal to reduce the number of places and 1 neither supported or objected to the proposal. 

35 of you who responded went on to give further detail on your views with the majority commenting on insufficient SEND provision, reducing choice for families and the quality of provision.

We Did

Your comments were fully considered and addressed in the Decision Report which can be viewed here

Based on evidence of the number of specialist places required for children with hearing impairment and that the proposal will not affect children currently occupying places in the Special Support Centre, the West Sussex County Council Director for Education and Skills took a decision that came into effect on 28 March 2018 to approve the proposal. The number of places the County Council commissions at the Special Support Centre at Hazelwick School will be amended to 4 places, for implementation from September 2018.

Thank you to everyone that responded.   

We Asked

The Council has a statutory duty to consult on admission arrangements each year where there are proposed admission arrangement changes and once every seven years if there are no proposed changes.  We asked for your  views on its proposed admission arrangements for children who will be starting or transferring schools in September 2019. 

You Said

112 of you took part in this survey.

We Did

The Cabinet Member for Education and Skills has:- 

1.     Approved the National Scheme of Co-ordination for starting school and secondary transfer for 2019/2020 and changes to the non-statutory dates.

2.     Agreed the proposal to decrease the Published Admission Number for Lyndhurst Infant School from 120 to 90.

3.     Agreed the proposal to combine the catchment areas of Midhurst CE Primary (Controlled) and Easebourne CE Primary (Controlled) Schools creating a dual catchment area for both schools to enable more appropriate place planning in the area.

4.     Agreed that the proposal to remove the North/South dividing line in the oversubscription criteria for secondary schools in the Horsham Town area is not taken forward at this time, but that it is revisited in the near future when a new mixed secondary school is established.

We Asked

The Shoreham Harbour Regeneration Partnership, who has produced the Shoreham Harbour Joint Area Action Plan, asked for comments at various stages of the documents preparation. 

You Said

Comments made have been taken into account during the preparation of the documents. A schedule of proposed main and minor modifications to the plan, following the last representations stage, as well as a summary of representations have been submitted to the inspector for their consideration as part of the examination of the Plan.

We Did

In accordance with regulations*, Adur District Council, Brighton & Hove City Council and West Sussex County Council submitted the Shoreham Harbour Joint Area Action Plan to the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government on 31 May 2018 for independent examination. The Proposed Submission Joint Area Action Plan, together with supporting documentation submitted to the Secretary of State, is available on the Adur & Worthing Councils websites at:

https://www.adur-worthing.gov.uk/shoreham-harbour-regeneration

https://www.brighton-hove.gov.uk/content/planning/planning-policy/shoreham-harbour-regeneration

*Regulation 22 of the Town and Country Planning (Local Planning) (England) Regulations 2012.

Hard copies of the submission documents are available at the following locations for inspection during opening hours:

Brighton

 Bartholomew House, Bartholomew Square, BN1 1JE

 Jubilee Library, Jubilee Street, Brighton, BN1 1GE

Chichester

 County Hall, West Street, Chichester, PO19 1RQ

Hove

 Hove Town Hall, Norton Road, BN3 3BQ

 Hove Library, 182-186 Church Road, Hove, BN3 2EG

Portslade

 Portslade Library, 223 Old Shoreham Road, Portslade, BN41 1XR

Shoreham

 Shoreham Centre, Pond Rd, Shoreham-by-Sea, BN43 5WU

 Shoreham Library, St Mary’s Road, Shoreham-by-Sea, BN43 5ZA

Southwick

 Southwick Library, Southdown Road, Southwick, BN42 4FT

 Shoreham Port, Nautilus House, 90-100 Albion St, BN42 4ED

Worthing

 Portland House, Richmond Rd, Worthing, BN11 1HS

Examination

The Shoreham Harbour Joint Area Action Plan will now be subject to an independent examination which will be conducted by the Planning Inspectorate on behalf of the Secretary of State. Details will be published on the councils’ websites. Notification will also be sent to all those who made representations at previous Regulation 19 stages (Proposed Submission Shoreham Harbour Joint Area Action Plan 2017).

A Programme Officer has been appointed to assist the Planning Inspector. All future correspondence relating to the public examination hearings should be via the Programme Officer, using the following contact details:

Mr Chris Banks

Programme Officer

Mob: 07817 322750

email: bankssolutionsuk@gmail.com

We Asked

We asked for your feedback on the proposal to amend the Special Support Centre provision at Maidenbower Junior School from Additional Learning Needs to Autistic Spectrum Condition, to enable provision which is more in line with need and to make best use of available funding.

You Said

72 of you took part in the consultation and fed back your views on the proposal via the online survey or by email.  60 of the responses were in support of the proposal, 6 neither objected nor supported and 6 responses objected to the proposal. 

47 of you who responded went on to give further detail on your views and the overarching message was that additional provision for children with Autistic Spectrum Condition is very much needed and welcomed.  

Thank you to everyone that responded.    

We Did

The West Sussex County Council Cabinet Member for Education and Skills took a decision that came into effect on 28th February to approve the proposal to amend the Special Support Centre provision at Maidenbower Junior School from provision for Additional Learning Needs to provision for Autistic Spectrum Condition, for implementation from September 2018. 

You can view the Cabinet Member Decision Record and the Decision Report here.

We Asked

The County Council has a statutory duty to commission sufficient school places for children and young people across the County.  Having identified areas of growth in the number of Primary and Secondary School Places, we asked you to provide feedback on proposals for expansion at Felpham Community College, St Mary's Catholic Primary in Bognor Regis and Easebourne CE Primary in West Sussex from 2019.

You Said

190 of you took part in the consultation and fed back your views on the various proposals for school expansion via the online survey, by letter or by email. Letters were also received from the Heads and Governing Bodies from all the schools and the Diocese of Chichester and the Diocese of Arundel & Brighton. 

There were 30 responses to the proposed expansion of Felpham Community College, 14 of which were in support, 7 neither objected or supported and 9 were objections.  There were 17 responses for St Mary's Catholic Primary, 7 were in support, 2 neither objected or supported and 8 were objections.  Of the 125 responses for Easebourne CE Primary, 15 were in support, 21 were neither objected nor supported and 91 were objections.

We Did

The West Sussex County Council Cabinet Member for Education and Skills took a decision that came into effect on 22 Jan 2018 to approve the publication of statutory notices to further consult on the expansion of two of the schools, Felpham Community College and St Mary's Catholic Primary, Bognor Regis. 

The statutory public notice is attached below or can be accessed hereFurther details about the proposals for Felpham Community College and St Mary's Catholic Primary, Bognor Regis are provided below and can be found here

There is a representation period for comemnt of 4 weeks which commences from 8th February 2018. 

The Cabinet Member further decided that the expansion of Easebourne CE Primary School is not currently progressed.  He suggests that this requires the investigation of alternative options to cater for demand in the area and further consultation may take place in the future with schools and the wider community in the Rother Valley.